News

Update November 17, 2014

Second season of fieldwork completed.

The second season of fieldwork at Khor Kharfot was completed during the last week of October, 2014 by a team of 16, including a team of 9 botanists and wildlife specialists from Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat led by Dr Reginald Victor, 2 archaeologists from the US and 2 rangers from local government. Despite difficult weather conditions caused by a tropical cyclone in the Indian Ocean, all objectives were completed and the team returned safely to Salalah.

It is expected that a number of reports and papers will ultimately result from the data gathered, plus possible future fieldwork in the various disciplines involved.

Team Image:

(L-R) Back Row: Warren Aston, Abdulla al Shuraiki (Botanist), Ric Hauck (Archaeologist), Kimball Banks (Archaeologist), Thekra al Mantheri (Assistant to Dr al Farsi), Amina al Farsi (Botanist), Jayanthi Victor (Limnologist), Reginald Victor (Limnologist, Biologist), Ahmed Jashool (Veterinary Science), David Clayton (Biologist), Ahmed Hardan (Ranger)

(L-R) Front Row: Muhammad Haneef (Cook), Matt Thurmond (Team Support), Ahmed al Wahaibi (Botanist), Abubakr Bouzier (Ranger), Ibrahim al Zakwani (Research Assistant).

 

Update: July 27, 2014

Paper based on first fieldwork given at the annual Seminar for Arabian Studies in London (www.theBFSA.org).

Archaeologists Carl Phillips and Michele Degli Esposti presented a paper titled "Khawr Kharfut (Dhofar, Sultanate of Oman) re-visited" on Sunday afternoon, July 27th. Based on their fieldwork as part of the April team, the paper will appear in the forthcoming Proceedings in 2015.

 

Update: May 22, 2014

First project completed in Oman

From April 25th to May 3rd 2014 the first field work carried out under the Foundation’s auspices took place at Khor Kharfot. Archaeologists Dr Carl Philips (UK) and Dr Michele Degli Esposti (Italy) carried out the first planning and surveying of the man-made structures at Kharfot, while Dr Iftikhar Ahmed Abbasi (Pakistan), a geologist and associate professor at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, made a geological assessment of the inlet. The reports and papers that will result from their assessments will guide the Foundation’s plans for future work at the site.

Long-time Mesoamerican archaeologist Dr Richard Hauck (USA) also participated in the project, together with eight other support personnel from the US, Australia and Indonesia. A range of other activities was also undertaken during the project, including the use of motion-activated camera traps in an effort to identify predator species still extant and a continuing study of caves at the inlet and near Dhalqut.

Khor Kharfot is a difficult environment to work in and it’s secrets are yielded only slowly. However, most research objectives were met and the effort has provided a solid basis for the planned botanical expedition later in 2014.

The Foundation gratefully acknowledges the support of the College of Engineering at Dhofar University in Salalah for kindly providing the use of a Total station for the project.

Further details will be posted as the reports become available.

Team Image:

(L-R) Neil Prendergast (Canada), Dr Iftikhar Ahmed Abbasi (Pakistan), Dr Michele Degli Esposti (Italy), Scot Proctor (USA), Mariah Proctor (USA), Dr Carl Phillips (UK), Maurine Proctor (USA), Dr Mark Hamilton (USA), Chad Aston (Jakarta), Dr Rick Hauck (USA), Caleb Barnes (USA) and Warren Aston (Australia). Image courtesy Scot Facer Proctor.

(L-R) Neil Prendergast (Canada), Dr Iftikhar Ahmed Abbasi (Pakistan), Dr Michele Degli Esposti (Italy), Scot Proctor (USA), Mariah Proctor (USA), Dr Carl Phillips (UK), Maurine Proctor (USA), Dr Mark Hamilton (USA), Chad Aston (Jakarta), Dr Rick Hauck (USA), Caleb Barnes (USA) and Warren Aston (Australia). Image courtesy Scot Facer Proctor.